How to Treat a Bee Sting Naturally

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You’re at a picnic, minding your own bzzz-ness when all of a sudden a bee stings your child. No need to panic. If you’ve ever been stung by one yourself, you know that bee stings hurt like crazy. But, unless your child is allergic, the venom is actually relatively harmless, as long as you get the stinger out as soon as possible.

If you can still see the stinger, scrape it off above the surface of the skin with your fingernail or a credit card. Do not try to dig below the surface of the skin for the rest of the stinger — that will shed with normal skin healing. And be sure not to pinch or squeeze it or the tiny sac attached to the stinger could release more venom.

Once the stinger is out, wipe the area clean with a good, natural soap and water. Then make a baking soda, vinegar and water mixture and dab on the wound. This will help relieve pain and soak up extra venom. Afterwards, ice the area to decrease swelling. Shower your child with plenty of warm hugs and kisses.

bee stingFor the next few days, the area may be red, puffy and itchy. Try to make sure your child doesn’t scratch it too much.

To keep bees at bay in the future, keep this in mind:

  • Be watchful in areas with blooming flowers, garbage, and fruit trees, and try to steer clear when you can.
  • Dress your child in solids instead of floral prints — believe it or not, bees get tricked into thinking your little one is a gorgeous field of flowers!
  • Teach your child not to swat or anger a bee.
  • Keep your child’s shoes on — bees hovering in the grass often sting kids’ feet, which hurts like the Dickens.

In the extremely rare instance that your child shows immediate signs of being allergic (wheezing, dizziness, swollen face or lips, nausea), dial 911 and get to the emergency room ASAP.

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