Make Bubble Bath Time Fun and Easy

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There’s nothing more fun than filling a warm bathtub with a rich, frothy layer of sweet-smelling bubbles, right? Kids not only love the gentle tickle as bubbles pop on their skin but they’re also fascinated by all of the cool properties of lather. Not to mention: those bubbles actually serve an incredible practical purpose: a layer of bubbles acts as a pretty effective insulator, keeping bath water warmer for longer.

Still, not every little one starts out loving bath time. Very young children may fuss and cry—after all, it’s still a relatively new experience for them! And older dirt-lovers may protest all that cleanliness. But if you follow some tips, you can keep your child’s bath tear-free, fun, and easy:

Bring in the fun

Place a few simple bath toys into the water to encourage your child to explore. There are great bath toys on the market like this colorful tug boat, $12.99, which is made of 100% recycled materials and is free of BPA, phthalates, and PVC. Likewise, stacking cups and a small, simple strainer from the kitchen can also do the trick.

Blow bubbles

Yes, the little frothy bubbles feel great. But the best part about a bubble bath is blowing big, fun bubbles that your child can pop! Even as an adult, we can all admit that the structure of a beautiful, round bubble is a scientific marvel. Let your child have a little play time in the bath to be amazed as you blow bubbles: encourage him to pop them, place a few in his hands, let one land on his hand. Also, be picky about the soap you use and check the labels carefully. Many baby soaps contain moisture-draining ingredients that can lead to dry skin and cradle cap, a yellow scaly rash. California Baby Bubble Baths are free of sulfates and synthetic fragrances and non-stripping (plus, they come with a fun bubble-blowing wand). Check out some fascinating facts about bubbles.

Look up

Some kids start to dislike the bath because they don’t like getting water in their eyes. But toddlers and even preschoolers don’t always listen when you tell them to “look up”! In fact, especially when they’re playing with toys in the bath, they’re much more likely to look down. What to do? Try sticking a bath visor on his head, which will help any water run off away from his face.

Make it a ritual

As we all know, children like structure. Make bath-time part of a bigger nighttime or morning routine. Immediately before or after the bath, follow with a soothing massage, snuggle skin-to-skin, and read him a story. Even better, choose a book about bath time like the colorful and whimsical Tubby by Leslie Patricelli. Also, keep in mind: kids are pretty adept at reading their parents’ moods. So go into the experience yourself feeling calm and reassure your child in gentle tones.

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