Toxins In Your Coffee? How to Make a Safer Brew

coffee

If you’re like millions of people, you enjoy starting the day with a nice, steaming hot cup of coffee (or two after a long night of baby waking up a lot!). And that’s not a bad thing. Studies have shown that coffee has positive effects on longevity, prevention of some diseases, and mood benefits.

There are ways to make what inside your cup healthier (nix the artificial sweeteners, choose fair trade and organic coffee beans). But have you ever thought about how you brew your java?

A healthier coffee maker

Many coffee makers on the market are made with some plastic parts, including some with BPA, an endocrine disruptor that’s been linked to everything from certain types of cancers to fertility issues. Although some companies label their products as BPA-free, others don’t. And still others may be replacing those plastic parts with chemicals that could be just as bad for your health.

Take a serious look at your coffee maker, and consider replacing it with a model that has no plastic parts that come into contact with what you drink. (Boiling water plus plastic does not make for a good drink.) There are some made of glass and stainless steel, or even porcelain.

A safer coffee filter

Another thing to keep in mind: in drip machines, every last ounce of your morning brew typically gets filtered through a paper filter. So, the safety and purity of that filter makes a big difference. There are some good options available like Swanson Unbleached Coffee Filters that are made from unbleached, totally chlorine-free paper. They’re also certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, so they are shown to have the least possible environmental impact, and sold in a 100% recycled paperboard box.

How about coffee pods?

Consider a different option if you’re currently using a coffee pod brewing system. The pods are often made of plastic, which may have health effects and is also having a significant effect on the environment. In his book Caffeinated, journalist Murray Carpenter said that if you took the 8.3 million pods produced by just one manufacturer in 2013 and lined them up, it would be enough to wrap around the equator 10.5 times!

 

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